Paul Haldeman’s sensitivity to the seasons and his constant attention to trees led him to the realization that with our ever moderating winter temperatures, sap was flowing in appreciable amounts during three discrete periods: In the fall, as we transition to winter; during our January thaw; and again in the late winter/early spring. Tapping isn’t just for late winter anymore!

Turns out season impacts taste as well. Jeri’s discerning palate detected the significance seasons had on the flavor and color of the syrups produced. The winter syrup tends to be light with a clean, delicate flavor. Spring syrup tends to be more golden with a traditional “maple” taste reminiscent of the leaf buds which are being fed by the sap. Fall syrup? Stay tuned—it’s our first year drawing and boiling fall sap! We’re anticipating a full, rich syrup, and are excited to see what is produced. Certainly it will be delicious in its own unique way.

As November envelops us here on Zoar Road, we are approaching an ideal tapping window—consistent night temperatures below freezing, days when the thermometer climbs above the frosty line. We’re nearly there!

Deanna Nelson

Deanna Nelson

A barrister by day, Deanna won’t be giving up her day job, yet she enjoys nothing more genuinely than being in the woods or relishing the beauty of Zoar Road and surrounding environs with this tight-knit community and her three children.
Deanna Nelson

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